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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards
Letter From the Editor: Dr. Cindy Haines
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
 
November 2014 Edition

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- This month, I head to Pittsburgh for Women's Health Conversations (WHC), held on Nov. 6, 2014. I have been asked to speak on one of my favorite topics: How to better understand what the health care system can (and can't) do for us in our quest for well-being. This conference, aimed specifically at women, was founded by Vonda Wright, M.D., who asserts that women hold great power in transforming health and thereby transforming our culture and our economy.

I think back to WHC 2013 and my time with the attendees, as well as the wonderful women who spoke at the event. Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a cardiologist, was one of these women. One of my brightest memories of the event was when Dr. S shared some of her favorite chocolate with me -- dark and low in sugar. Yes, I knew we were destined to be great friends!

When I think back on this, I think about how intuitive it was for her to bring some chocolate for her well-being (and as it turned out, mine too!). A little something that boosted mood, facilitated bonding, and is associated with some other positive health benefits. In fact, one headline from Physician's Briefing this month featured news of a small study that investigated a cocoa flavanol concoction in relation to age-related memory loss:

Lab-Created Cocoa Drink May Improve Memory Loss

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A lab-created cocoa drink appears to improve normal age-related memory loss, according to a small new study. The findings have been published in the Oct. 26 issue Nature Neuroscience.

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This kind of news is welcome, especially these days when fear is on the rise with such outbreaks as enterovirus D68 and Ebola. We've covered it all here at Physician's Briefing, from the news of the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States and the subsequent best practices reminders:

CDC Issues Ebola Best Practices Reminder for Providers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a general reminder to travelers and health care providers on best practices regarding Ebola.

CDC Website
Texas Department of State Health Services Website

…to the latest interim guidance issued for health care providers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

CDC Issues Revised Interim U.S. Guidance on Ebola

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Today, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a revision of their Ebola guideline document -- Interim Guidance for Monitoring and Movement of Persons with Ebola Virus Disease Exposure.

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As health care professionals, we know we need to stay abreast of the latest happenings in health. But we are also human -- and susceptible to the overload and burnout that this fast-moving and demanding world can deliver. It is along these lines that I conclude with another Physician's Briefing headline from October, which issues the reminder that burnout, like life, is often multifactorial and as such requires a multifactorial solution:

Burnout on the Job Isn't Just About the Work

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Work, non-work, and individual factors explain a considerable part of psychological distress, depression, and emotional exhaustion, according to a study published online July 24 in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

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As always, we at Physician's Briefing continue to strive to make your professional life at least a little bit smoother. Please let us know how we can do better.

Until next time -- here's to you, and your health.

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines

Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @ twitter.com/drcindyhaines

Contact the Editors

October 2014 Edition

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WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Greetings from HealthDay as we welcome another month together. Coming up fast is an event this November where I have been asked to speak on one of my favorite topics: How to get empowered with education for better health. This conference is aimed specifically at women. Women's Health Conversations (WHC) was established in September 2013 with the belief that today's generation of women can transform our nation's health for the betterment of all. Vonda Wright, M.D., asserts that women make more than 80 percent of the health care decisions in this country, not only for themselves but for their children, spouses, parents, and often their friends and even coworkers. That is, women hold great power in transforming health and thereby transforming our culture and our economy.

WHC 2014 will be held on Nov. 6, 2014, in Pittsburgh. In the meantime, some headlines from Physician's Briefing remind us that everyday tools are available to us, to help us in our quest for better health:

Walking Protects Against Functional Limitation in OA

SUNDAY, Sept. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis, walking is associated with reduced incidence of functional limitation over two years, according to a study published in the September issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Walking may not only protect against painful joints, but can boost healthy levels of good high-density lipoprotein cholesterol as well. More good news:

Higher HDL Cholesterol May Help Protect Against Cancer

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with a decreased risk of cancer among individuals with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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A healthy diet is also important for cholesterol levels. And when it comes to nutrition, Mother Nature may truly know best:

Artificial Sweeteners May Raise Blood Glucose Levels

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial sweeteners can potentially make blood glucose levels rise despite containing no calories, researchers report online Sept. 17 in Nature.

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Other natural tools are in the news this month, too, with yoga therapy showing promise for specific mental health conditions:

Yoga Offers Benefits to Patients With Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with bipolar disorder, yoga seems to be beneficial, with positive emotional, cognitive, and physical effects, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice.

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And while I am gearing up to talk with the ladies, I definitely don't want to leave the gentlemen out! Here is some other great news about how staying fit helps ward off common health conditions longer, and this research focused exclusively on men:

Blood Pressure Seems to Stay Lower Longer in Fitter Men

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise leading to strong cardiorespiratory fitness can delay a man's onset of age-related high blood pressure, researchers report in the Sept. 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Here's to you, and your health.

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines.

Contact the Editors

September 2014 Edition

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TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's September! For many of us, this means we are back to the school routine. This includes incoming medical students and other health care professionals in training. As part of my academic appointment, I teach third- and fourth-year medical students case studies in medicine. The other role I have is to function as a mentor for those interested in medical communications. For the last few years, I've met with pre-professional students as well as incoming first-year medical students and fielded questions and concerns about what life in medicine is really like, and if it is really right for them. A recent Huffington Post piece I wrote on just that:

Thoughts for First-Year Med Students

August marks the time that first-year students begin medical school at my alma mater. This year I was asked to host one of the groups at a lunch and answer any questions they might have about medical school (and life beyond). I am fortunate that my dad is a great role model in the land of health and wellness. A family physician, he showed me by living example that a career in medicine can and should be a lifelong learning and sharing exercise. And that the way other people do it doesn't mean that's the way you have to do it. You are the captain of your own ship -- steer it in any direction you wish.

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These interactions with my emerging health care colleagues give me a lot to think about. One such reflection is how we, as mentors and as a society, can help these healers stay committed and vibrant in their careers of service. How, in this rapidly changing environment of heightened challenges and declining morale, can empathic, sensitive, and smart professionals stave off burnout and continue to enhance their learning, while caring for themselves adequately in order to continue to best care for others?

At Physician's Briefing, we strive to do just that in a number of ways. First, we understand that health care professionals are busy -- maybe too busy! Still, they want and need to stay on top of emerging health news, trends, and guidelines. We provide the need-to-know health news in short, digestible format, with links back to the full source for those who want more information. We also understand that maintaining requirements for licensure and board certification is one more thing health care pros need to think about. In addition to keeping up with the news, you can earn CME credits for doing it. Archived Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit&#trade; are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. One recent CME sampling, relevant to both patients and providers alike:

Job Strain Can Raise Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Stress at work may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

Solja T. Nyberg, of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in Helsinki, and colleagues conducted a pooled analysis of data for 124,808 men and women free of diabetes at baseline. The authors sought to assess the association between job strain and risk of incident type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that, after multivariable adjustment, individuals with job strain, compared with those without job strain, had an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.25) for both men (HR, 1.19; 95 percent CI, 1.06 to 1.34) and women (HR, 1.13; 95 percent CI, 1.00 to 1.28). Stratified analysis showed that job strain was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes among those with healthy and unhealthy lifestyle habits.

"In conclusion, we show a modest but robust association between job strain and the development of type 2 diabetes irrespective of lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity," the authors write.

Two study authors have received income for other work related to job stress.

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In the course of tracking health news, we also learn about trends in health care professional satisfaction and happiness, and this news is often not good:

AMGA: Physician Turnover Still High in 2013

THURSDAY, Aug. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For the second year running, physician turnover remains at the highest rate since 2005, according to a report published by the American Medical Group Association (AMGA).

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and

More Than Half of General Surgery Residents Want to Quit

FRIDAY, Aug. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of categorical general surgery residents seriously consider leaving residency, according to a study published online July 30 in JAMA Surgery.

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But we also find and pass on options for burnout prevention. One such way is diversification. Rather than early retirement, perhaps scaling back in one way and bringing on another source of income or professional satisfaction can help. You would not be alone:

Many Physicians Have Secondary Income

MONDAY, Aug. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report earning income from sources other than their primary practice/employer, according to an article published July 24 in Medical Economics.

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To continue evolving our professional outreach, we are looking for other ways we can help health care pros help themselves in order to better help others. One such way is developing partnerships with organizations that provide tools for health care professionals, such as practice management strategy, social media outreach, and reputation management.

If you are a potential partner organization, please let us know about how you'd like to join in the effort to help our healers and our healing profession -- help we seem to need more than ever. We are all in this together -- let's do this! A more unified and caring world awaits us.

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines.

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August 2014 Edition

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FRIDAY, August 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's back to school already? That's what's happening for many of us this month, believe it or not (I can't)! Whether we need back-to-school physicals or are just doing some back-to-school shopping, our health is a key driver for a successful start to the school year.

As you and your loved ones think about starting up the back-to-school routine, there is a great deal to keep up on in the pursuit of wellness and well-being. Vaccination, always a hot topic, hits home for parents and health care providers of preschoolers as well as preteens and teens.

To help health care providers gear up to hit preteen and teen immunization targets, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via @CDCizlearn conducted a Twitter Chat on July 28 (Hashtag: #vaxchat). I was invited to join the chat as a panelist to discuss the importance of a provider's recommendation in a parent's decision to vaccinate their child. The chat provided some tools to help providers frame that discussion with parents, with emphasis that HPV vaccine is cancer prevention and that provider recommendation is trusted above most others by parents. The chat reached an estimated 1.6 million users. Panelists included the March of Dimes, the Minnesota Department of Health, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Salt Lake County Health Department, Denver Public Health, and Dr. Esther Krych from Mayo Clinic.

Also this month, the American Academy of Pediatrics released updated information on meningococcal vaccination recommendations:

AAP Updates Recommendations for Meningococcal Vaccines

MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations are presented for meningococcal vaccination in a policy statement published online July 28 in Pediatrics.

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And, hot on the heels of these new recommendations were data on preteen/teen vaccination rates from the CDC:

Teen Vaccinations Up But HPV Coverage Remains Low Overall

MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 2012 to 2013, coverage for adolescents aged 13 to 17 years increased for all routinely recommended vaccinations. Increases ranged from 1.4 percentage points for at least one tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) dose to 13.8 percentage points for at least one human papillomavirus (HPV) dose in males. These findings were published in the July 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Other recent coverage from Physician's Briefing includes a report on why boys as well as girls should be targeted for HPV vaccination:

Viewpoint: Why Boys Should Be Vaccinated Against HPV

WEDNESDAY, July 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Programs to introduce and implement the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for boys will cut incidence of HPV and several cancers, according to a personal view published online July 29 in BMJ.

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Still other infectious disease news from the CDC helps providers and consumers of health better understand potential emerging threats:

CDC: Ebola Risk in U.S. Low But Provider Vigilance Urged

TUESDAY, July 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant risk of an Ebola outbreak in the United States; however, U.S. health care workers need to be mindful of the importance of testing and isolating sick travelers returning from the affected areas, according to a media briefing conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday.

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In addition to keeping up with the news, you can earn CME credits for doing it. Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ available in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Here is a recent CME sampling within the specialty of Obstetrics & Gynecology, weighing the risks of a procedure we've been tracking:

Uterine Cancer in 27/10,000 Women Undergoing Morcellation

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing hysterectomy with morcellation, the prevalence of uterine cancers is 27 per 10,000, with increased prevalence with advanced age, according to a research letter published online July 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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And when it comes to the business of medicine, Twitter chats on health (like the one we did with the CDC) are not the only use of this medium in health care delivery:

Twitter Increasingly Used to Share Urological Meeting Info

THURSDAY, July 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Twitter is utilized as a significant communication platform at urological meetings, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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We at Physician's Briefing are dedicated to covering all such health news to help navigate the rapidly changing tides of health information and delivery.

Whether your kids -- or you -- are headed back to school soon, I hope this finds you rested and refreshed, having experienced a pleasant summer. But whether you've found time to enjoy the fruits of the season, or you've been hard at work all summer long, we hope that Physician's Briefing makes it a little easier to stay on top of what's important in the land of health news for health pros. Here's to the journey.

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines.

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July 2014 Edition

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TUESDAY, July 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- We are in the thick of the summer season and here's hoping this correspondence finds you safe, healthy, and happy. To help all consumers and health care providers gear up to approach summer in a more healthful way, we at HealthDay conducted a Twitter Chat on June 4 (Hashtag: #Summerhealth). Co-hosted with Mayo Clinic, the chat included experts from Cleveland Clinic, Seattle Children's, the American Academy of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and a doctor from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The chat also included 365 participants and generated almost 13 million impressions; Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were the top influencers.

As you and your family and friends think about heading out for summer fun, there is a great deal to keep up on in the pursuit of wellness and well-being. Recent news from Physician's Briefing includes a report on the bacterial levels at U.S. beaches:

Survey Reveals 1 in 10 U.S. Beaches Fails Bacteria Test

WEDNESDAY, June 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Ten percent of water samples taken from U.S. coastal and lake beaches fail to meet safety standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a new report finds.

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Other news cautions us that some novel treatments to heal "weekend warriors" may not cut it:

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections Don't Aid Muscular Injuries

THURSDAY, June 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Intramuscular platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections do not provide clinical benefit for acute hamstring injuries, according to a correspondence piece published June 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Article (subscription or payment may be required)

Still other news from one of the biggest summer conferences, ASCO, reminds us that our everyday lifestyle choices matter:

ASCO: Fish, Exercise May Help Thwart Colon Cancer's Return

WEDNESDAY, June 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The likelihood that patients will suffer a return of colon cancer more than doubles if they eat fish less than twice a week, or if they get less than 60 minutes of moderate exercise a week, researchers reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from May 30 to June 3 in Chicago.

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Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Here are a couple of recent CME samplings within the specialty of Diabetes & Endocrinology:

Intensive Lifestyle Changes Lead to Lasting Improvement in T2DM

MONDAY, June 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For obese/overweight adults with type 2 diabetes, an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) is associated with a reduced risk of incident depression and with better physical function, according to a study published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

Thomas A. Wadden, Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues compared the effects of an ILI with a diabetes support and education (DSE) control intervention on long-term changes in depression symptoms, antidepressant medication use, and health-related quality of life. Participants included 5,145 overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes who were followed for a median of 9.6 years. They administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline, annually at years one to four, and at year eight.

The researchers found that, compared with DSE, ILI correlated with a significant reduction in the incidence of mild or greater depression symptoms (BDI scores equal or greater than 10; hazard ratio, 0.85; P=0.0145). Both groups experienced a worsening of Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component summary scores over time, but throughout the first eight years the ILI participants reported better physical function than DSE participants (all P values less than 0.01). No significant between-group differences were seen in the proportion of participants who used antidepressant medications or in SF-36 mental component summary scores.

"These findings should be considered when evaluating the potential benefits of ILIs," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and weight loss industries.

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New Hemoglobin A1c Targets Established for T1DM

MONDAY, June 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New hemoglobin A1c targets have been established for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes, according to a position statement published online June 16 in Diabetes Care. The position statement was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, held from June 13 to 17 in San Francisco.

The etiology and pathophysiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are distinct and should be considered separately. With this in mind, Jane L. Chiang, M.D., from the American Diabetes Association in Alexandria, Va., and colleagues summarized data specific to the comprehensive care of patients with type 1 diabetes.

According to the guidelines, glycemic targets should be individualized with the aim of achieving the best possible control while minimizing the risk of severe hyper- and hypoglycemia. Based on clinical studies and expert opinion, the recommended hemoglobin A1c target should be less than 7.5 for all pediatric age groups (youth aged younger than 18 years). This target, which is lower than the traditional recommendations, should be pursued as long as patients can avoid severe, recurrent hypoglycemia. For nonpregnant adults, the recommended glycemic target is less than 7.0 percent, which reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes. For older adults, the targets vary from less than 7.5 to less than 8.5 percent based on comorbidities. The statement also addresses the diagnosis of diabetes; initial evaluation and follow-up; assessment and treatment of psychosocial issues; monitoring of blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin; treatment options; and specific settings and populations.

"The 7.5 percent target is evidence-based; however, we want to emphasize that blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c targets must be individualized to safely achieve the best outcomes," Chiang said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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And while we are on the topic of endocrinology, health care access issues (and potential opportunities) are at hand here:

Shortage Seen for Adult Endocrinologists

TUESDAY, June 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is a shortage of adult endocrinologists that will continue to grow with increasing patient demand, according to a study published online June 18 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Other recent "business-of-medicine" coverage includes:

Tips Offered for Finding Buyer for Medical Practice

TUESDAY, June 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Suggestions are provided for finding a buyer for a medical practice in an article published online June 10 in Medical Economics.

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As seasons change, much remains the same -- and finding time to keep up with it all continues to be a challenge. We hope that Physician's Briefing makes it a little easier for you to stay on top of the ongoing stream of updating information.

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

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June 2014 Edition

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MONDAY, June 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's summertime: Time to sit back and unwind . . . or maybe not. Summer often means we are busier in a different way: As individuals engaged in amped up leisure activity; as parents juggling kids home from school; and as clinicians treating the variety of summertime ills we are familiar with (poison ivy), and some we are not so familiar with (MERS). To help all consumers and providers of health gear up to approach summer in a more healthful way, we are conducting a Twitter Chat on June 4 from 1 to 2 p.m. ET (Hashtag: #SummerHealth). HealthDay is once again co-hosting with Mayo Clinic, and guests will include experts from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Cleveland Clinic, Seattle Children's, and an ER doctor from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

These health experts will share thoughts on what one needs to know about making summer healthy, happy, and safe. We'll discuss issues such as how to help kids manage their diabetes, allergies & asthma at camp; pool safety; packing a family first aid kit; outdoor summer health issues to be aware of (poison ivy, bug bites, wild animals, etc.); how to deal with illness on a trip; traveling abroad with food and other allergies; vaccines and travel; and how to safely exercise in the heat.

In addition to summer-specific information, there is a lot to keep up on in the ever-changing world of medicine. Other newsworthy items from recent Physician's Briefing headlines include an alert from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on the dosing of sleep medication:

FDA: Start Sleep Medication Lunesta at Lower Dose for Safety

THURSDAY, May 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The recommended starting dose of Lunesta (eszopiclone) has been lowered due to studies showing that levels of the medication, in some patients, can remain high enough in the morning to interfere with driving and other activities that require mental alertness, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday. This impairment can occur even if patients feel fully awake, the FDA said.

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And ongoing updates and alerts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization about the potential threat of MERS:

WHO: MERS Not Yet a Public Health Emergency

WEDNESDAY, May 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The World Health Organization says that, while there's growing concern about infections caused by the MERS virus, the threat does not yet constitute a public health emergency.

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Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Here are a couple of recent CME articles within the specialties of Cardiology and Diabetes & Endocrinology:

Many at High Cardiovascular Risk Still Not on Statins

TUESDAY, May 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals at high risk for cardiovascular events, such as those with coronary artery disease, diabetes, or both, are not receiving statins, according to research published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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For CME credits

Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Improve Glycemic Control

MONDAY, May 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with insulin resistance, short bursts of intense exercise may be an effective alternative to a prolonged bout of continuous, moderate exercise for improving glycemic control, according to research published online May 8 in Diabetologia.

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For CME credits

Other news for you, the health care pro navigating the modern age of rapidly advancing technology, are recent headlines from Medical Economics.

Physicians Have Multiple EHR Documentation Strategies

THURSDAY, May 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are multiple documentation strategies available for physicians to use to improve their interaction with patients and optimize their use of electronic health records (EHRs), according to an article published April 8 in Medical Economics.

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Docs Must Consider Legal Issues Relating to Text Messaging

WEDNESDAY, May 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The legal issues surrounding text messaging by physicians need to be considered, according to an article published May 23 in Medical Economics.

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Finally, at Physician's Briefing, we know that you need to take care of yourself so that you can continue to help others. The American Medical Association agrees:

Physicians Need to Focus on Managing Their Own Stress

MONDAY, May 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Managing stress and finding a reasonable work-life balance is important for physicians, according to a viewpoint written by Jeremy A. Lazarus, M.D., the immediate-past president of the American Medical Association (AMA).

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At Physician's Briefing, we work hard to make it easier for you to keep up on all the latest need-to-know health news as it's happening. Please let me know how we are doing and how we can improve in creating a virtual information connection with you. We want to move ever forward in helping your professional life function more smoothly and -- dare I say it -- making the journey more fun. We are all in it together -- the good fight must go on!

Yours truly,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

May 2014 Edition

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THURSDAY, May 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After a long, hard winter for many of us here in the United States, we may be facing a particularly difficult spring allergy season. HealthDay and Mayo Clinic co-hosted an #AllergyChat this month. This Twitter chat reached about four million people and generated about 10 million impressions. More than 140 participants sent about 800 tweets during the hour (with an average of six tweets per person). HealthDay, Cleveland Clinic, and Mayo Clinic were the top influencers.

Some other allergy news from recent Physician's Briefing headlines:

Winter's Polar Vortex Ushers in Spring's 'Pollen Vortex'

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Allergy experts say that the long, cold winter kept trees dormant for longer than usual, which means tree pollen season will overlap with grass pollen and mold seasons this year.

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Both experts interviewed for the article by HealthDay reporters pointed out that new oral allergy therapies for grass and ragweed pollens have been recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, offering an alternative to allergy shots:

FDA Approves Ragwitek for Adult Ragweed Allergy

FRIDAY, April 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Ragwitek has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat allergy to short ragweed among adults aged 18 to 65.

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FDA Approves Sublingual Tablet for Grass Allergies

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Oralair has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first sublingual treatment for certain grass allergies.

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Beyond pharmacology, other novel forms of relief are on the horizon:

New Nasal Filter May Relieve Allergy Symptoms

FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Rhinix nasal filter seems to be beneficial for adults with allergic rhinitis, according to a letter to the editor published online March 3 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

And the mind-body connection is alive and well, specific to allergies:

Perceived Stress Positively Linked to Allergy Flares

TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Those with persistent emotional stress may have more frequent allergy flares, according to a study published in the April issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

As always, what could be better than staying abreast and reminded of best practices for better medicine? Getting your CME credits for doing it! We began offering the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ on select Physician's Briefing articles in the fall of 2013. Adding free CME credits to Physician's Briefing articles is a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online accounts, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Here are a couple of recent CME articles within the specialties of Cardiology and Diabetes & Endocrinology:

Dietary Legume Intake May Cut LDL Cholesterol Levels

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary pulse (beans, chickpeas, lentils, and peas) intake seems to be associated with reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published online April 7 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Full Article
Abstract
Full Text

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

Drinking More Coffee May Cut Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, April 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing coffee consumption may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research published online April 24 in Diabetologia.

Full Article
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

Other news of potential interest to you, the health care pro, is the ever-evolving Affordable Care Act. Some of the latest:

Sebelius Stepping Down As HHS Secretary

FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is stepping down from her position, after overseeing the troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act that remains unpopular with some Americans and virtually all Republican lawmakers.

Full Article

New Health Secretary to Confront Health Care Reform Hurdles

MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With the resignation of U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Friday, the Affordable Care Act will get a fresh face. But turning around public perception of the controversial health care reform law in a politically charged mid-term election year poses an enormous challenge for the department's next leader, policy experts said.

Full Article

Lots happening in our fast-moving world of health and health care. At Physician's Briefing, we strive to make it easier to keep up on all the latest need-to-know health news as it's happening.

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

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April 2014 Edition

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TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spring officially arrived March 20 -- here's hoping the weather catches up soon! It has been a long, hard winter for many of us. A focus on the weather can provide an opportunity to remember that such variables can impact physical as well as emotional health:

ASA: Lower Annual Temp Tied to More Stroke Hospitalizations

Hospitalizations for stroke and associated death rates may increase with changes in environmental temperature and dew point, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's International Stroke Conference, held from Feb. 12 to 14 in San Diego.

Press Release
More Information

And while warm (dare we even say hot?) days may still be fodder for fantasy, other headlines remind us that a hard winter may mean a hard summer, which can potentially impact mortality:

Hot Weather-Related Deaths Expected to Climb

A considerable increase in heat-related mortality is anticipated in the coming years, partly driven by projected population growth and aging, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

I believe mindfulness around such "everyday" variables could make global differences in how we approach health and healing. Mindfulness around another everyday issue for health care providers was highlighted in a recent health headline proclaiming stethoscopes may be more contaminated than most parts of a physician's examining hand. Bad news, yes. Or maybe it's not news at all? I say there is news here (and good news, too): Once we are aware, reminded, and mindful of this potential issue, there are simple steps we can take to help better protect our patients.

Stethoscopes Contaminated After Single Physical Exam

Stethoscopes get contaminated after a single physical exam, with the contamination greater than that seen on most of the physician's dominant hand, barring the fingertips, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Full Article
Full Text

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

What could be better than staying abreast of (and being reminded of) best practices for better medicine? Getting your CME credits for doing it! We began offering the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ on select Physician's Briefing articles in the fall of 2013. Adding free CME credits to Physician's Briefing articles is a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online accounts, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health.

But let's get back to the weather. As springtime approaches (slowly but surely!), allergies will once again rise to the surface in our minds as we see more and more sniffling and coughing patients in our offices. Let's discuss! Please join us for our next Twitter Chat scheduled for Wednesday, April 2, 2014, at 1 p.m. ET. We are partnering with Mayo Clinic to chat with a variety of allergy experts from UCLA Health, the Cleveland Clinic, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Mount Sinai Hospital, National Jewish Health, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Hashtag: #AllergyChat.

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

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March 2014 Edition

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MONDAY, March 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As we enter a new month, a look back seems appropriate. February was American Heart Month, a time to mindfully focus on heart health. But why stop now just because it's March? As I write this, I am preparing to head to the Go Red for Women Luncheon in New York City. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be the leading cause of death among women and men in the United States, as well as a leading cause of disability. CVD adds up to approximately $300 billion each year to the U.S. health care tab, when accounting for the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity from premature death. Among the headlines this month, lots to catch up in cardiovascular health -- for everyone in the battle against CVD:

Gender-specific guidelines were released for stroke prevention in women:

AHA/ASA Release Female-Specific Stroke Prevention Guidelines

FRIDAY, Feb. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gender-specific guidelines aimed at reducing strokes based on risk factors unique to women have been published online Feb. 6 in Stroke in a statement for health care professionals from the American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA).

Abstract
Full Text

And the U.S. Food and Drug Administration weighed in on what isn't likely to help in heart health:

FDA Panel Sees No Heart-Safety Advantage With Naproxen

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The science isn't convincing enough to say that naproxen is safer for the heart than other popular nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, U.S. health advisers ruled Tuesday.

Full Article

And so did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force:

USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Vitamin Prevention of CVD, CA

MONDAY, Feb. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found that the evidence is insufficient to evaluate the benefits and harms of multivitamins and most single- or paired-nutrient supplements for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Task Force findings have been published in a final recommendation statement available online Feb. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Still other news pointed us to what patients can do to help themselves:

Whole Diet Approach Beats Low-Fat Diets in Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean-style diet incorporating vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, and olive oil can reduce cardiovascular events and provide benefits similar to statins, according to a review published online Dec. 31 in the American Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

And, for their part, what the government and big industry can do:

Strategies ID'd for Cutting Sodium in Restaurant Meals

MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Various strategies are available to help encourage restaurants to reduce the sodium content of food items, according to a study published Jan. 23 in the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Full Article
Full Text

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

On the frontlines of clinical care, news that more (and more expensive) testing may not be needed in the important identification of those at risk:

Rapid Recovery on Exercise ECG May Obviate Need for More Tests

FRIDAY, Feb. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Additional testing for ischemic heart disease is less likely to yield benefit in those with rapid recovery of electrocardiographic (ECG) changes on the exercise treadmill test (ETT), according to research published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Article
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

And a reminder that therapy for other conditions might set patients up in a way not intended:

Testosterone Use Ups Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Men

TUESDAY, Feb. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is increased following initiation of testosterone therapy (TT) in men, according to research published online Jan. 29 in PLOS ONE.

Full Article
Full Text

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

Oh, yes, CME. We began offering the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ on select Physician's Briefing articles in the fall of 2013. Adding free CME credits to Physician's Briefing articles is a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online accounts, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Additional CME specialties are planned for 2014.

Finally, on the medicine-as-business front, it appears that new media continues to gain steam. One question is: How can we as health care providers use this to work for us rather than against us? News along those lines:

Online Ratings Do Affect Patient Choice of Physician

TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of the general U.S. population is aware of online physician rating sites, according to a research letter published in the Feb. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

ACC, AHA Releases Heart Disease, Stroke App for Docs

THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile and web-based app has been released to help health care professionals determine their patients' 10-year and lifetime risks of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD).

More Information

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

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February 2014 Edition

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MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The new year of 2014 finds the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in full swing. At Physician's Briefing, we strive to select the most relevant and interesting clinical and health care business news for you, the audience of our news service for busy health care professionals. Among the headlines this month, news about the continuing evolution of the ACA and related entities, such as Accountable Care Organizations:

Over 100 New Accountable Care Organizations Formed

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- One hundred twenty-three new Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) have been formed by doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers, which will provide access to high-quality coordinated care for about 1.5 million Medicare beneficiaries, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

More Information

In addition to direct care issues, the ACA has extended its reach to public health via the daily decisions consumers make:

Health Law Calls for Calorie Counts on Vending Machines

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There may be a lot more counting of calories when people buy snacks from vending machines or order food in certain restaurants under rules currently being crafted as part of the final phase of the Affordable Care Act.

Full Article

And old news was made new again: Thoughts from the White House on contraception requirements under the ACA:

Obama Administration Stands by Contraception Rule

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama administration on Friday contested U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's decision temporarily exempting an order of Catholic nuns from the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate.

Full Article

Clinical news coverage also remains robust at Physician's Briefing, including the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ on select Physician's Briefing articles, a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online accounts, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Sample CME articles from January 2014:

Mediterranean Diet + Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Cuts Diabetes Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean diet enriched with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is associated with reduction in the risk of new-onset diabetes among older adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Article
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

And:

Guideline Adherence Cuts Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- All-cause and cancer-specific mortality is lower in postmenopausal women who follow the American Cancer Society (ACS) Nutrition and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

Full Article
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

On the medicine-as-business front, we seek information that can be of benefit to you on the frontlines:

Urgent Care Can Be Opportunity for Practice Expansion

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians are exploring expansion into urgent care as a means to grow their practice, but some important factors should be assessed before jumping in, according to an article published Nov. 25 in Medical Economics.

More Information

As well as in exploration of trends that will affect the future of medicine:

Some Medical Schools Offering Accelerated Training

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Some medical schools are offering an accelerated three-year program, according to a report from Kaiser Health News.

More Information

With a desire to expand the conversation, our first Twitter Chat of 2014 is scheduled for Feb. 12, 2014. We are partnering with the Mayo Clinic for a lively discussion on love and relationships and how they relate to health and well-being. Please join us on Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014, at 1 p.m. EST. Hashtag: #RelationshipChat.

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines
Connect with Dr. Haines on Twitter: @drcindyhaines

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January 2014 Edition

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THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Happy New Year from all of us at HealthDay! 2013 was certainly an eventful year, with lots of news of particular interest to the audience of Physician's Briefing, our news service for health care professionals. With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (and the resultant anticipated and unanticipated effects), there was much news on the business of health care to report and discuss, in addition to the usual onslaught of clinical news health care professionals seek.

By far, the most frequent and perhaps most relevant headlines of 2013 belonged to the Obama administration and the Affordable Care Act. The administration had high hopes, but technical glitches on the federal government's HealthCare.gov portal changed the trajectory of the initiative:

Obama: 'No Excuse' for Troubled HealthCare.gov Website

MONDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Saying he's confident the problems will get fixed, President Barack Obama admitted today that there is "no excuse" for the troubles plaguing the beleaguered HealthCare.gov website. "There's no sugar-coating it. The website has been too slow, people have been getting stuck during the application process, and I think it's fair to say that nobody's more frustrated by that than I am," he said during the nearly 30-minute-long address in the White House Rose Garden.

Full Article

Things seemed to be turning around as the year drew to a close, but reaching conclusions on the success or even viability of this initiative seems premature:

Surge in Federal Health Insurance Exchange Enrollments

MONDAY, Dec. 30, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1.1 million people enrolled in a qualified health plan through the federally operated marketplace, or exchange, from Oct. 1 through Dec. 24, government officials said Sunday. More than 975,000 of those enrollments came in December, Marilyn Tavenner, administrator for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, said in a blog post.

Full Article

Other headlines that dominated this year included a May announcement from Angelina Jolie: She carries the BRCA breast cancer gene mutation and opted for a double mastectomy to reduce her cancer risk. In related news:

USPSTF Supports Counseling, BRCA Tests for At-Risk Women

MONDAY, Dec. 23, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women who are identified as being at risk for BRCA mutations be offered counseling and genetic testing, according to a final recommendation statement published online Dec. 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text - Evidence Review
Full Text - Recommendation Statement

We watched in horror as the Boston Marathon bombing and subsequent morbidity and mortality unfolded:

Doc Describes Medical Tent Experience of Boston Marathon

WEDNESDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- The experience of a physician in the medical tent at the Boston marathon provides insight into the impact of the bombings on medical professionals at the scene; the perspective piece was published online April 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Major changes in how health care providers are guided to provide cardiovascular care also hit the news this year:

Guidelines Issued for Assessing Risk of Atherosclerotic CVD

THURSDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based recommendations for assessing the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have been developed by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology; the guidelines were published online Nov. 12 in Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text

and

New Guidelines Issued for Cholesterol Management

THURSDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based recommendations for the management of cholesterol for the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) have been developed by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology; the guidelines were published online Nov. 12 in Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text

And the news was not universally accepted:

Some Doctors Challenge New Statin Guidelines

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- A new online cholesterol risk calculator produced by two leading U.S. heart organizations is flawed and overstates a person's risk of heart disease, a pair of Harvard Medical School professors say. The professors contend that this flaw could lead the calculator to mistakenly suggest that millions of people should be taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, The New York Times reported Monday.

Full Article

Just one month later, there were more new cardiology-focused guidelines:

Evidence-Based Guidelines Issued for Hypertension Management

FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in adults for 2014 have been issued by the Eighth Joint National Committee, according to a special communication published online Dec. 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial 1
Editorial 2
Editorial 3

Other stories making headlines in 2013 included:

CDC: More Than One in 10 Kids Diagnosed With ADHD
FDA Urges Tighter Controls on Certain Prescription Painkillers
CDC: Evocative Campaign Motivates Smokers to Quit

And several headlines ushered in a new focus on "helpful" microbes living in the trillions in the human digestive tract:

Lower Microbial Diversity for Infants Who Develop Colic
Low Gut Bacterial Richness Linked to Obesity
Donor Fecal Infusion Effective for C. difficile Infection

On both fronts -- the business of medicine developments and the "in-the-trenches" clinical care developments -- we strive to offer you efficient and productive ways to stay on top of it all. We track and cover the "need-to-know" and provide it in the way we heard you prefer it: short, to the point, reliable, and relevant to you. We also make it a point to provide links to the source material, for those of you who want more information on any given item or topic.

And what could be better than staying on top of the latest developments in health care? Getting CME credit for doing so. Thus, we began offering the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ on select Physician's Briefing articles in the fall of 2013. Adding free CME credits to Physician's Briefing articles is a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online accounts, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Additional CME specialties are planned for 2014.

To tie together our communication tools in a way that creates value for those seeking to reach busy professionals, HealthDay also began offering Physician's Briefing Essentials, a managed and hosted turnkey physician communications program, in late 2013.

Physician's Briefing Essentials is a communications package sent to physicians to communicate key updates, improve relationships, and provide physicians and other medical professionals with useful and timely information.

Physician's Briefing Essentials combines value-added clinical news, free CME credits, and a vehicle to inform physicians about new hospital programs and services into one user friendly online experience.

To learn more about Physician's Briefing Essentials, click here.

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines

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December 2013 Edition

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MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- This fall brought another exciting announcement from all of us at HealthDay, this one of particular interest to the specific audience of Physician's Briefing, our news service for health care professionals. In addition to now offering the opportunity to earn free AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ on select Physician's Briefing articles, HealthDay is now offering Physician's Briefing Essentials, a managed and hosted turnkey physician communications program.

Physician's Briefing Essentials is a communications package sent to physicians to relay key updates, improve relationships, and provide physicians and other medical professionals with useful and timely information.

Physician's Briefing Essentials combines value-added clinical news, free CME credits, and a vehicle to inform physicians about new hospital programs and services into one user-friendly online experience.

To learn more about Physician's Briefing Essentials visit www.healthday.com/pb_essentials.html

Adding free CME credits to Physician's Briefing articles is a result of the joint sponsorship of Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC and HealthDay. Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing education credit to physicians. After reading articles that are accredited for CME, physicians can create their own online account, track their learning activity, and easily print certificates.

Physician's Briefing articles with AMA PRA Category 1 credit™ are available via five daily articles in the five featured specialties of: Cardiology, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Hematology & Oncology, and OBGYN & Women's Health. Additional CME specialties are planned for 2014.

To learn more about our CME offerings, please find a sample CME article here:

Nut Consumption May Impact Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Those who consume nuts have a lower risk of total and cause-specific mortality, according to research published in the Nov. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Article
Abstract
Full Text

To earn CME credits for reading this article, click here

Other news this month (of course!) centered around the evolving roll-out of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). How is this affecting you and your practice? News swirls around how the ACA and other insurance changes will affect the physician-patient relationship. One recent Physician's Briefing headline:

American Medical Groups Protesting Physician Cuts

MONDAY, Nov. 25, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Medical societies are taking action against the mass cancellations of physicians in Medicare Advantage plans in many states, according to an article published online Nov. 22 in Medical Economics.

More Information

At the same time, we've always known (and research continues to support) the importance of the provider-patient relationship, with optimal communication and continuity paramount. Another recent Physician's Briefing headline:

Continuity of Care Impacts Patient-Doc Communication

FRIDAY, Nov. 22, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- For Veterans Administration (VA) outpatients, low continuity of primary care correlates with reduced quality of patient-provider communication, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In continuing to bridge this all back to the intention of our service to you, the health care provider: We select clinical news of relevance and importance to you, and provide the opportunity to earn CME credit on many of these. We will also continue our coverage of non-clinical news of interest to health care professionals.

Sincerely,

Dr. Cindy Haines

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