Nurse Case Management Boosts Benefit of Home BP Telemonitoring

Greater reduction in systolic blood pressure seen among predominantly low-income Black and Hispanic stroke survivors
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Medically Reviewed By:
Mark Arredondo, M.D.

TUESDAY, June 11, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Among predominantly low-income Black and Hispanic stroke survivors with uncontrolled hypertension, the addition of nurse case management (NCM) to home blood pressure telemonitoring (HBPTM) leads to greater systolic blood pressure (BP) reduction than HBPTM alone, according to a study published online June 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Gbenga Ogedegbe, M.D., from NYU Langone Health in New York City, and colleagues evaluated whether HBPTM (12 home measurements/week for 12 months, with results transmitted to a clinician) plus NCM (20 counseling calls over 12 months) results in greater systolic BP reduction than HBPTM alone. The analysis included 450 predominantly low-income Black and Hispanic stroke survivors with uncontrolled hypertension and significant comorbidity.

The researchers found that participants in the NCM plus HBPTM group had a significantly greater systolic BP reduction than those in the HBPTM-alone group at 12 months (−15.1 versus −5.8 mm Hg). When adjusted for primary care physician clustering, the between-group difference in systolic BP reduction at 12 months was −8.1 mm Hg. At 24 months, the rate of recurrent stroke was similar between the groups (4.0 percent for both).

"Additional studies are needed to understand the long-term clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and generalizability of NCM-enhanced telehealth programs among low-income Black and Hispanic stroke survivors with significant comorbidity," the authors write.

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