American Diabetes Association, June 21-24

diabetes doctor patient
Adobe Stock
Medically Reviewed By:
Meeta Shah, M.D.

The annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association was held this year from June 21 to 24 in Orlando, Florida, drawing more than 15,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in diabetes. The conference highlighted the latest advances in diabetes research and improving patient care, with presentations focusing on treatment recommendations and advances in management technology.

As part of the SURMOUNT-OSA trial, Atul Malhotra, M.D., of the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues found that tirzepatide may serve as a new treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

The authors conducted two randomized phase 3 trials of tirzepatide compared with placebo among individuals with OSA and obesity. The first study included individuals not using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), whereas the second study included individuals using CPAP. The researchers observed a statistically and clinically significant improvement in apnea-hypopnea index (the primary outcome) in patients receiving tirzepatide, with concomitant improvements seen in blood pressure, C-reactive protein, hypoxic burden, body weight, and patient reported outcomes.

"The standard of care has always been to treat both obesity and OSA in afflicted patients," Malhotra said. "Tirzepatide offers an option to promote weight loss effectively and may be a reasonable therapy for OSA patients unable or unwilling to use CPAP."

Several authors disclosed ties to biopharmaceutical companies, including Eli Lilly, which manufactures tirzepatide and funded the study.

Press Release

In a 12-month retrospective analysis, Satish K. Garg, M.D., of the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues found that continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) should be recommend for all patients with diabetes.

The authors used data from a large claims database of over 7.1 million patients with type 2 diabetes using noninsulin therapies, basal insulin, and prandial insulin, to compare hemoglobin A1c levels before and after CGM use. The researchers found that CGM use among type 2 diabetes patients improved glucose control across all therapeutic regimens studied, with improvement seen as early as three months.

"I hope there will be more adoption of CGM use across all patients with diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes," Garg said.

Several authors disclosed ties to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Press Release

Peter Calhoun, Ph.D., of the Jaeb Center for Health Research in Tampa, Florida, and colleagues found that CGM metrics can accurately classify risk of imminent stage 3 type 1 diabetes.

The authors combined five studies to assess whether CGMs can accurately identify imminent clinical onset of symptomatic type 1 diabetes among individuals with one or more positive islet autoantibodies. The researchers found that CGM metrics achieved high precision for predicting disease progression and can be used to classify an individual's risk of an impending type 1 diabetes diagnosis.

"We hope future drug trials will use CGM metrics as an eligibility requirement to identify those at highest risk of progression, and patients with one or more positive islet autoantibodies will consider utilizing CGMs temporarily to better understand their own risk of developing stage 3 type 1 diabetes," Calhoun said. "Accurately understanding an individual's risk of imminent stage 3 type 1 diabetes diagnosis has major benefits. Individuals who are aware of their very-high risk will better recognize hyperglycemia symptoms and act sooner to confirm diagnosis, thereby potentially decreasing the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis at onset of stage 3 disease. These individuals may also benefit most from any drugs and treatment strategies that delay the onset of stage 3 type 1 diabetes diagnosis."

Several authors disclosed ties to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Abstract No. 74-OR

ADA: Bisphenol A Linked to Reduced Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity

THURSDAY, June 27, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A administration is associated with reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity among healthy adults, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, held from June 21 to 24 in Orlando, Florida.

Read Full Text

ADA: Inhaled Insulin Shows Promise for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, June 27, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled insulin is associated with improved hemoglobin A1c levels over 16 weeks among adults with type 1 diabetes when compared to usual care, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, held from June 21 to 24 in Orlando, Florida.

Read Full Text

ADA: Semaglutide Similarly Effective in Men, Women With Obesity-Linked Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with obesity-related heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, semaglutide reduces body weight to a greater extent in women but yields similar improvements in heart failure-related symptoms in men and women, according to a study published online June 23 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, held from June 21 to 24 in Orlando, Florida.

Read Full Text

ADA: Tirzepatide Reduces Apnea-Hypopnea Index in Moderate-to-Severe OSA

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Tirzepatide reduces the apnea-hypopnea index among individuals with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and obesity, according to a study published online June 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, held from June 21 to 24 in Orlando, Florida.

Read Full Text

Related Stories

No stories found.
logo
www.healthday.com