High-Efficacy Therapy Cuts Disability Progression in Pediatric MS

Those treated with high-efficacy therapy while in the minimal disability state had largest reduction
High-Efficacy Therapy Cuts Disability Progression in Pediatric MS
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Medically Reviewed By:
Mark Arredondo, M.D.

FRIDAY, April 12, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of pediatric-onset relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with high-efficacy therapy reduces the risk for transition across disability states, according to a study published in the May issue of The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health.

Sifat Sharmin, Ph.D., from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues examined how high-efficacy therapies influence transition across five disability states in individuals with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis. Data were included from 151 centers across 41 countries. People with onset of multiple sclerosis symptoms at younger than 18 years were included if they had a confirmed diagnosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and at least four Expanded Disability Status Scale scores recorded. Overall, 5,224 patients were included.

The researchers observed a reduction in the risk for disability worsening across the disability states with high-efficacy therapies. Compared with those who remained untreated, those treated with high-efficacy therapies while in the minimal disability state had the largest reduction (hazard ratio, 0.41). There was a decline seen in the benefit of high-efficacy therapies with increasing disability. Compared with those who remained untreated, young people with minimal disability who received low-efficacy therapy also experienced a reduced risk for transitioning to mild disability (hazard ratio, 0.65).

"The new perspective presented here on the effect of early high-efficacy therapies for preserving neurological function among people with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis provides a useful addition to the information guiding policy governing access to disease-modifying therapies in children with multiple sclerosis," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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