Most Slow Responders to Tirzepatide Do Lose Clinically Meaningful Weight

In a recent study, 90 percent who did not achieve ≥5 percent weight loss at week 12 went on to achieve clinically meaningful weight reduction
Most Slow Responders to Tirzepatide Do Lose Clinically Meaningful Weight
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Medically Reviewed By:
Mark Arredondo, M.D.

TUESDAY, May 14, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Among slow responders to tirzepatide treatment at week 12, 90 percent went on to achieve clinically meaningful weight reduction (≥5 percent) by week 72, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinology, held from May 9 to 11 in New Orleans.

Kimberly Gudzune, M.D., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues assessed the baseline characteristics and weight reduction achieved at 24 and 72 weeks in tirzepatide-treated participants by early response (≥5 percent weight reduction at week 12) and slow response status (<5 percent weight reduction at week 12). The analysis included 278 slow responders and 1,267 early responders participating in the SURMOUNT-1 trial.

The researchers found that at baseline, slow responders were more likely to be male (45 versus 30 percent) and had higher body weight (110.2 versus 103.6 kg), body mass index (39.1 versus 37.7 kg/m2), and waist circumference (117.5 versus 113.4 cm). At the end of dose titration at week 24, 70 percent of the slow responders achieved ≥5 percent weight reduction, while 90 percent achieved ≥5 percent weight reduction at week 72. Additionally, at week 72, 31 percent of the slow responders achieved ≥5 to <10 percent weight loss, 29 percent achieved ≥10 to <15 percent weight loss, 13 percent achieved ≥15 to <20 percent weight loss, 10 percent achieved ≥20 to <25 percent weight loss, 4 percent achieved ≥25 to <30 percent weight loss, and 3 percent achieved ≥30 percent weight loss. For slow responders who went on to achieve ≥5 percent weight loss, the mean time to reach 5 percent was 24.8 weeks. Overall, 1.8 percent of participants were nonresponders (lost <5 percent body weight) at week 72.

"It is reasonable to consider treatment for longer than 12 weeks to determine weight loss response to tirzepatide, which takes at least 20 weeks to reach the highest dose," the authors write.

The SURMOUNT-1 trial is supported by Eli Lilly, the manufacturer of tirzepatide.

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