Heavy Cannabis Use Linked to CVD Mortality in Women

No significant increase seen in all-cause, CVD, cancer mortality for heavy cannabis use versus nonuse among men
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THURSDAY, June 6, 2024 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy cannabis use is associated with a significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality among women, according to a study published online June 6 in JAMA Network Open.

Alexandre Vallée, M.D., Ph.D., from Foch Hospital in Suresnes, France, examined sex-stratified associations of cumulative lifetime cannabis use with all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality using data from volunteers in the U.K. Biobank population. Data were included for 121,895 participants.

During a median follow-up of 11.80 years, Vallée identified 2,375 total deaths, including 1,411 and 440 deaths from CVD and cancer, respectively. After full adjustment, in men, the hazard ratios (95 percent confidence intervals) were 1.28 (0.90 to 1.81), 0.98 (0.43 to 2.25), and 1.09 (0.71 to 1.67) for all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, and cancer mortality, respectively, for heavy cannabis users versus nonusers. In women, the corresponding hazard ratios (95 percent confidence intervals) after full adjustment were 1.49 (0.92 to 2.40), 2.67 (1.19 to 4.32), and 1.61 (0.91 to 2.83) among heavy cannabis users versus nonusers. Heavy cannabis use was associated with a significantly increased risk for all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, and cancer mortality in female current tobacco users and with CVD mortality among female never tobacco users, after full adjustment. Heavy cannabis use was associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer mortality in male current tobacco users.

"Individuals using cannabis should be considered for appropriate cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies, especially among females," Vallée writes.

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